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2009 Annual Meeting
Toward Zero Deaths: Every Life Counts

Savannah, Ga., August 30 - September 2

Agenda | Presentations | Photos | Exhibit | Sponsors/Partners

Grant Baldwin, PhD, MPH

Director, Unintentional Injury Division, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Grant Baldwin

Dr. Grant Baldwin became the Director of the Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention at the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control in September 2008. 

Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death for persons ages 1 to 44 years.  DUIP is dedicated to reducing the number and severity of unintentional injuries through science-based programs and applied research. 

Dr. Baldwin joined NCIPC in November 2006 as acting Deputy Director.   In this role, Dr. Baldwin assisted the NCIPC Director in providing overall leadership and direction for the Center. 

Prior to this appointment, Dr. Baldwin served as a senior advisor in the Coordinating Center for Environmental Health and Injury Prevention and the National Center for Environmental Health / Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.  Dr. Baldwin also spent several years in the ATSDR Division of Health Education and Promotion as a team leader in a group educating community members and health professionals about preventing exposure to toxic substances.  He began his career at CDC in September 1996.

Dr. Baldwin received his PhD in Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan School of Public Health in 2003. He also received a MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Health Education from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in 1996.

2009 Annual Meeting Index Page