Speeding and Aggressive Driving

Speed Limits

Setting speed limits has traditionally been the responsibility of states, except for the period of 1973-1994. During that time, the federal government enacted mandatory speed limit ceilings on interstate highways and similar limited access roads through a National Maximum Speed Limit.

Congress repealed the National Maximum Speed Limit in 1995. Since then, 41 states have raised speed limits to 70 mph or higher on some portion of their roadway systems.

In many states, maximum speeds vary depending on vehicle type (car or truck), roadway location (urban or rural), or time of day. GHSA tracks state maximum speed limits for both urban and rural interstates, as well as other limited access roads.

In a few states, speed limits are not set by law.

Aggressive Driving

The term aggressive driving covers a range of unsafe driver behaviors. State laws define what constitutes aggressive driving and stipulate the related fines and penalties. Often, a driver must demonstrate more than one action to be considered aggressive.

To date, 15 states have addressed aggressive driving in their legislatures.

11 states have passed laws specifically defining aggressive driving actions.

  • California and Utah have amended existing reckless driving laws to include actions similar to those defined as "aggressive" by other states.
  • Pennsylvania has passed a resolution against aggressive driving.
  • New Jersey enforces agressive driving under existing laws.

NOTE: GHSA does not compile any additional data on speed limit or aggressive driving laws other than what is presented here. For more information, consult the appropriate State Highway Safety Office.

Sources: National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and State Highway Safety Offices.

Short Term Description
GHSA tracks speed limits for both urban and rural interstates, as well as other limited access roads. In addition, GHSA tracks state aggressive driving laws, which cover a range of unsafe driver behaviors.

Florida Aggressive Driving Awareness Campaign

This spring, the Miami office of the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) is working once again to bring awareness to the dangers of aggressive driving through its Drive Safe campaign. From February through May, FDOT and its partners will be using social media, email blasts, PSAs and printed materials to spread the word against aggressive driving and provide tips to eliminate it.

Speeding and Aggressive Driving

Speeding – defined as "exceeding the posted speed limit, driving too fast for conditions, or racing" – is a dangerous driving behavior that is often overlooked.

GHSA Policy

Click here to view GHSA Policy and Priorities on Speed, Speeding, and Aggressive Driving

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