Mature Drivers

More and more Americans are outliving their ability to drive safely. As a result of impairments in three functions that are important for driving – vision, cognition and motor function – older drivers have a higher crash risk than middle aged adults.

To address this issue, many state driver licensing laws have specific provisions for older drivers.

  • 33 States and the District of Columbia have special provisions for mature drivers. These include: accelerated renewal frequency; restriction of online or mailed renewals; vision test; road test; or reduced or waived renewal fees.

NOTE: GHSA does not compile any additional data on mature driver laws other than what is presented here. For more information, consult the appropriate State Highway Safety Office.

Sources: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and State Highway Safety Offices.

Short Term Description
As a result of impairments in functions important for driving, older drivers have a higher crash risk than middle aged adults. To address this issue, many state driver licensing laws have specific provisions for older drivers.

Mature Drivers

Aged 65 and over, mature drivers (also referred to as older drivers) represent a growing segment of America's licensed drivers but face an increased risk of traffic-related injuries and fatalities. In 2017, there were 6,784 people age 65 and older killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes.1

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