Publication

A Guide for Effectively Partnering with State Highway Safety Offices

GHSA's A Guide to Effectively Partnering with State Highway Safety Offices identifies how organizations can collaborate with State Highway Safety Offices (SHSOs) to improve traffic safety outcomes. It explains how SHSOs operate; provides examples of partnership opportunities, both non-funded and funded; and includes a handy checklist for potential partners to reference as they work toward establishing relationships with SHSOs.

Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities by State: 2017 Preliminary Data

GHSA's annual Spotlight on Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities projects nearly 6,000 pedestrians were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2017. The report is a first glimpse at state and national trends in pedestrian traffic fatalities for 2017, using preliminary data provided by all 50 State Highway Safety Offices and the District of Columbia.

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Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities by State: 2016 Preliminary Data

GHSA's annual Spotlight on Pedestrian Traffic Fatalities projects an 11% increase in the number of persons on foot killed on U.S. roadways last year, compared to 2015. This report offers a first look at state-by-state trends in pedestrian traffic fatalities for 2016, using preliminary data provided by all 50 State Highway Safety Offices and the District of Columbia.

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Autonomous Vehicles Meet Human Drivers: Traffic Safety Issues for States

As autonomous vehicles (AVs) merge into our nation’s traffic, the most pressing safety challenge for states will be preparing human drivers. GHSA's first Spotlight on Highway Safety covering AVs, Autonomous Vehicles Meet Human Drivers: Traffic Safety Issues for States, examines the implications of new vehicle technologies for highway safety agencies and advocates.

Mission Not Accomplished: Teen Safe Driving, the Next Chapter

While the rate of teen driver-involved crashes has declined significantly over the last decade, there is still significant work to be done. A fresh look at 10 years of data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) shows the improvements in teen-involved fatal crash rates have not been as dramatic for older teens (ages 18-20) as compared to their younger counterparts (ages 15-17), and teen drivers are still 1.6 times more likely to be involved in a crash than adults.

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