Bicyclists and Pedestrians

GHSA does not track state pedestrian safety laws but does track bicycle helmet laws in states where they have been enacted. Few states have enacted bicycle helmet laws. While GHSA only tracks state laws, many localities require helmet use for some or all bicyclists.

  • 21 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands and the Virgin Islands have a helmet law for bicyclists below a certain age, generally about 16.
    • Only the Virgin Islands and Guam require helmets for all bicyclists.
  • The remaining (unlisted) 29 states and Puerto Rico have no bicycle helmet law.

Sources: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and State Highway Safety Offices.

Short Term Description
GHSA does not track state pedestrian safety laws but does track bicycle helmet laws in states where they have been enacted.

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Texting was associated with a higher rate of near misses and a failure to look left and right when crossing the road, a study found. By comparison, talking on the phone was associated with only a small increase in time taken to cross a road safely, and listening to music had no notable impact on pedestrian safety.

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Story by Rob Picheta

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Texting was associated with a higher rate of near misses and a failure to look left and right when crossing the road, a study found. By comparison, talking on the phone was associated with only a small increase in time taken to cross a road safely, and listening to music had no notable impact on pedestrian safety.

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Story by Rob Picheta

February 3, 2020

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Texting was associated with a higher rate of near misses and a failure to look left and right when crossing the road, a study found. By comparison, talking on the phone was associated with only a small increase in time taken to cross a road safely, and listening to music had no notable impact on pedestrian safety.

Texting More Dangerous for Pedestrians Than Listening to Music or Speaking on the Phone

Story by Rob Picheta

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